TAMPA, Fla. -- The Yankees received good news on their yellow-flagged players Monday, as MRI examinations on Robinson Cano and Damaso Marte revealed no structural damage.

Cano has been diagnosed with bursitis of the right shoulder and Marte with inflammation of the left shoulder, the club announced. Both players were examined by Yankees team physician Dr. Chris Ahmad and are listed as day-to-day.

The Yankees said that Cano will begin taking anti-inflammatory medications and continue on the club's strengthening program, and he could return to playing second base by Friday against the Twins.

"I knew in my mind that it was nothing bad, because I could throw," Cano said. "There was still a little pain, but it's a good thing it was just that, and I'll be ready in a few days."

Marte is scheduled to throw a bullpen session Tuesday and will need about two more throwing sessions before returning to game action during the weekend, Yankees manager Joe Girardi said.

"It could have been a lot worse, that's for sure," Girardi said.

Both Cano and Marte were injured while playing for the Dominican Republic in the World Baseball Classic. Marte felt tightness after lifting weights prior to a game and Cano had been feeling tightness before he left for the Classic on March 2.

He never mentioned it to the Yankees, feeling pressure to take part in the tournament.

"Maybe if I said from the beginning, it would be good by this time," Cano said. "The good thing is that it's only a few days. This is about your country. It's not about just going to play and have fun.

"I don't want to be one of those guys that they say, 'We needed you and you didn't want to play.' The good thing is that this didn't get worse. It's still the same and I'll be ready for Friday."

Cano entered Monday's game as a pinch-hitter, singling for Hideki Matsui in the sixth inning, and Girardi said he would try to use Cano as the designated hitter to continue getting him at-bats. Cano said that if he has an opportunity to be in a similar situation again, he plans to be more forthcoming with the Yankees' medical staff.

"The next time that I feel something, I'm going to tell the team before I leave," Cano said. "This is more important than the Classic. That's only three weeks -- this is where I belong. If I wasn't in the big leagues, I wouldn't be invited to play. I've got to put them first."