NEW YORK -- Nick Swisher was in his apartment on Tuesday afternoon, getting ready to head to Yankee Stadium, when he felt the building moving ever so slightly.

"I was like, 'Why is my TV shaking?'" said Swisher, who quickly realized he was experiencing an earthquake. "That was my first one. I couldn't believe it. In New York?"

Yes, in New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., and several other cities that aren't used to having noticeable seismic activity.

The 5.9-magnitude earthquake was centered near Richmond, Va., and struck at 1:51 p.m. ET. Slight tremors were felt by early-arriving staff at Yankee Stadium, as bobbleheads quivered in the offices.

Electricians and engineers went through a thorough checklist before Tuesday's game against the A's and found no irregularities in the stadium, the team said.

Yankees designated hitter Jorge Posada said that he was at home and felt the quake, which wasn't his first but seemed to be his strongest.

"Everything was shaking, but it was short," Posada said. "In Puerto Rico, my mom would always say, 'Did you feel the earth moving?' and stuff, but growing up, they weren't as big as today."

Yankees manager Joe Girardi was working out in the stadium gym and said he didn't notice anything out of the ordinary, though his phone lit up with text messages soon after.

"A couple of our people talked about it, where they just felt it a little bit," Girardi said. "I've never felt one, and I don't want to. [Head athletic trainer Gene Monahan] said he felt it, and I was giving him a hard time about it."

Phil Hughes was driving to the Stadium and didn't notice anything, but for the southern California product, it wasn't the first time he missed one.

"As a kid, my parents would always wake me up when we had one, but I've only felt one earthquake in my life," said Hughes, who grew up near Angel Stadium in Tustin, Calif. "I've probably been through 30, but a lot of times, they're in the middle of the night."

Hughes never expected to experience one in New York, but he chuckled at the extent of the media coverage surrounding the rare event.

"It's funny how big of a deal it is," Hughes said. "If this was California, it'd be, like, two seconds on the news."

Despite blip, Colon feels 'very strong'

NEW YORK -- After throwing 6 2/3 innings in Tuesday's 6-5 loss to the A's, Yankees starter Bartolo Colon has logged 131 frames this season. That may not seem like a lot for someone who has eclipsed the 200-innings mark six times in his career, but the workhorse version of Colon is a distant memory. He hasn't thrown more than 100 innings since 2005, when he pitched 222 2/3.

The right-handed Colon, a surprise success story for much of this season, says he has plenty left in the tank. But after Tuesday's defeat, he is winless in four starts this month and has a 5.73 ERA in 22 August innings. During that stretch, he has served up six home runs, but the Yankees don't appear too concerned yet.

"We talked about this going into Spring Training," manager Joe Girardi said. "We had some innings concerns with him, how he would respond to it. We just got into a situation where we didn't get any runs early tonight. I thought he threw the ball OK. We've seen him throw better, but we've also seen him have worse games than he's had tonight. It's something we'll continue to watch."

The Yankees have already gotten as much as they could have hoped for from Colon, who did not pitch in 2010 and has been bothered by injuries since his American League Cy Young Award-winning season in 2005. But other than missing a month with a strained left hamstring, the hefty righty has stayed on the field this season.

"I feel really happy, very strong," Colon said on Tuesday. "All I have to do is keep working hard and see what happens."

The signs are not all bad for Colon. His control has not abandoned him, even during his recent struggles. He did not walk a batter Tuesday and has five for the month. But his strikeouts have dipped. After averaging 8.1 whiffs per nine innings through the end of July, Colon has averaged just 5.7 this month.

Colon said that on Tuesday he shied away from his two-seam fastball -- normally one of his best weapons -- because of the success Kansas City had against it last week. Both A's homers -- including the one Brandon Allen deposited in the third deck in right field -- came on sliders.

"It doesn't really concern me," Colon said of the homers. "They have the bat and I throw the ball, and you never know what is going to happen."

A-Rod plans to meet with MLB on Friday

NEW YORK -- Alex Rodriguez said that he will meet with Major League Baseball investigators on Friday in Baltimore to discuss his alleged involvement in high-stakes poker games.

Rodriguez said that he would talk with reporters at Camden Yards on Friday afternoon following the meeting, adding that he "can't wait."

A supermarket tabloid reported last month that Rodriguez was involved in a high-stakes illegal poker game in Beverly Hills, Calif., in 2009, although a source later indicated that Rodriguez had not actually been at the event in question.

Rodriguez was warned by MLB and the Yankees in 2005 to avoid such activities.

Following the publication of the article, MLB issued a statement that read, "We take this very seriously and have been investigating this matter since the initial allegation. As part of the investigation, the Commissioner's Office will interview Mr. Rodriguez."

Bombers bits

• Left-hander Aaron Laffey and catcher Gustavo Molina have cleared waivers. Laffey was optioned to Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, while Molina was outrighted to Triple-A.

• Right-hander Sergio Mitre returned from a visit to Dr. James Andrews in Pensacola, Fla., with some encouraging news -- he will be able to avoid surgery for now. Mitre has been diagnosed with a nerve issue in his pitching shoulder, but no structural damage. Mitre said he is hoping to be healthy for Spring Training 2012.

• Yankees manager Joe Girardi said that the team's plan is that it will start right-hander Freddy Garcia in the second game of Saturday's day-night doubleheader in Baltimore.