BALTIMORE -- After jetting up and down the East Coast to prepare for his big league comeback, Andy Pettitte played catch in the outfield on Monday at Camden Yards and was happy to be returning to some semblance of normalcy.

Pettitte's Minor League rehab took him from Tampa, Fla., to stops in places like Rochester, N.Y., and Trenton, N.J., and that travel wore on the 39-year-old left-hander, who can now count on being wherever the Yankees' schedule says he should be.

"That was crazy -- I mean, that was crazy," Pettitte said. "[I said], 'Lord, keep me healthy please,' just because I was flying all over the place. And I was worried about my legs and I was worried about staying loose. I just wanted to stay healthy."

Pettitte said he felt good one day after allowing four runs in 6 1/3 innings to the Mariners, and he is preparing for his next start, scheduled to come at home against the Reds on Friday.

One day after taking the loss in his comeback, Pettitte said his biggest regrets were his pitch selection and not making adjustments quickly enough. But the veteran was pleased with how his nerves evaporated.

"I was just able to settle in and get into a decent rhythm, and I felt just really comfortable out there," Pettitte said. "I thought it would feel a little awkward and another part of me thought, 'OK, you've prepared for this, you know what it's going to feel like.'"

Pettitte said that he and his oldest son, Josh, have been sending supportive text messages to each other. Josh's high school team was knocked out of its playoff series on Friday in Texas, and Pettitte was digitally trying to cheer his 17-year-old up from New York.

After Sunday's start, which included Casper Wells' two-run homer in the sixth, Pettitte said his cell phone flashed to life with the following message: "You looked good out there, Pops. Wells got lucky."

Jeter passes Yount with hit No. 3,143

BALTIMORE -- With a third-inning single to center field on Monday, Derek Jeter moved past Robin Yount for sole possession of 17th place on baseball's all-time hits list with 3,143.

In his second at-bat of the night, the Yankees captain notched the hit off Orioles starter Jason Hammel. Jeter was left aboard when Curtis Granderson grounded out.

The next player on the all-time list is Hall of Famer Paul Waner, who is the only player in Major League history with more hits than Jeter who also played for the Yankees. Jeter has stood alone as the Yankees' all-time hits leader since eclipsing Lou Gehrig's total of 2,722 in September 2009.

Nicknamed "Big Poison," Waner had 3,152 career hits, of which just one was with the Yankees; it came on Sept. 1, 1944, against the Washington Senators in Waner's first Yankees at-bat.

Waner played in 10 games for New York during the war years of 1944-45, going 1-for-7 in 10 plate appearances. The majority (2,868) of Waner's hits were logged with the Pirates, as he also played for the Dodgers and Braves.

Staying in lineup, Tex toughing out cough

BALTIMORE -- The hacking cough that has given Mark Teixeira fits for the last month hasn't been enough to knock him out of the lineup, but it certainly isn't helping his production at the plate.

Yankees manager Joe Girardi said that he has entertained the idea of giving Teixeira more rest as the first baseman tries to shake a nagging bronchial issue, but thus far, the Yankees are hoping that Teixeira's condition -- and stats -- will improve without the switch-hitting slugger missing any time.

"He has not been healthy for a while here," Girardi said. "He's had a cough for a month, and he's continued to play through it. Sometimes it's really, really bad.

"We've talked about a DH day here or giving him a day off, but he said he physically feels all right to play. It's just when he starts coughing, it's kind of hard to stop. It takes a little bit of time. Hopefully, it's going away and we can get through it."

Teixeira saw a specialist last week in New York, but that alone didn't turn around a 5-for-22 homestand that saw Teixeira batting .223 with four homers and 17 RBIs as the team departed for Baltimore.

Girardi said that he might give Teixeira one day off on the Yankees' current trip to Baltimore and Toronto, but his faith in Teixeira as a perennial 30-homer, 100-RBI threat has not been shaken.

"I think it's too early," Girardi said. "We've seen these slow starts from Mark; most years, we've talked about this. I think he's swung the bat a little bit better. I hope it continues and he gets back to full strength."

Details of Pettitte's contract revealed

BALTIMORE -- Andy Pettitte will be guaranteed his full $2.5 million salary from the Yankees on Thursday, The Associated Press reported, citing details of the left-hander's contract.

Pettitte was placed on the Major League roster on Sunday and will earn a prorated share of a $2 million base salary, worth $1,573,770, after missing the first 39 days of the season.

The lefty's contract calls for two roster bonuses: $500,000 for five days and $250,000 for 10 days. It also calls for performance bonuses of $500,000 for one start and $250,000 each for two and three starts.

However, the contract says Pettitte's total of base salary and earned bonuses cannot exceed $2.5 million.

Bombers bits

• The New York Yankees Foundation will hold its second annual New York Yankees/New Era Pinstripe Bowl Charity Golf Tournament on Tuesday in Monroe Township, N.J. For more information, visit yankeesfoundation.com/golf.

• Each of the Yankees' last four saves were recorded by four different pitchers (Mariano Rivera, David Robertson, Rafael Soriano and Boone Logan). This marked the first time it has happened since Sept. 18-26, 2006, when Jose Veras, Kyle Farnsworth, Rivera and Scott Proctor collected saves.

• On this date in 1967, Mickey Mantle hit career home run No. 500 in the seventh inning off the Orioles' Stu Miller, providing the margin of victory in a 6-5 Yankees win at Yankee Stadium. On this date in 1996, Dwight Gooden pitched the eighth no-hitter in franchise history, defeating the Mariners, 2-0, at Yankee Stadium. Gooden threw 134 pitches, walking six and striking out five.