ARI@LAD: Putz exits the game with injury in ninth

LOS ANGELES -- D-backs closer J.J. Putz was forced to leave Tuesday night's 5-3 win against the Dodgers in the ninth inning after feeling stiffness in his right elbow.

"We're going to go see the doctor tomorrow and go figure out what it is," Putz said.

Putz was brought on to protect a two-run lead and walked the first batter he faced, Nick Punto, on four pitches.

After the final pitch, Putz began clenching and unclenching his right hand and shook it several times. After being looked at briefly on the mound by head athletic trainer Ken Crenshaw, Putz was removed and Heath Bell was summoned from the bullpen.

As it turns out, Putz felt the stiffness and zinging after the second pitch, but he tried to pitch through it.

"I didn't know what it was, and then after it happened two more times, I thought I probably should say something," Putz said.

Sleep will likely be hard to come by for Putz on Tuesday night in anticipation of the visit to the doctor.

"The hardest thing is just not knowing what it is," Putz said. "I've never felt anything like it before."

Gibson cherishes spending time with Scully

50 Greatest Moments: #1 Gibson's magic

LOS ANGELES -- Manager Kirk Gibson got a visit Tuesday afternoon from one of his favorite people in the game of baseball -- Dodgers Hall of Fame broadcaster Vin Scully.

Scully talked with Gibson for awhile in the visiting manager's office before batting practice.

"It's a pleasure and honor to be able to sit and talk with him," Gibson said.

Gibson peppered Scully with questions about the recent movie "42," which depicts Dodgers legend Jackie Robinson breaking the color barrier. Scully started broadcasting Dodgers games a few years after Robinson made his debut.

"He gave me some other stories about that time and things that happened," Gibson said.

Gibson listened to Scully well before he joined the Dodgers as a player in 1988.

One of Scully's best known calls is Gibson's game-winning homer in Game 1 of the 1988 World Series.

"He's iconic, he's great for the game, he's got a great call and I'm just honored to have the acquaintance and be able to spend time with him," Gibson said. "He's got a great perspective on life and baseball. I always tell him when he walks out I say, 'You know, Vin, I really enjoy spending time with you, but you do know we're going to try and beat your butt tonight.'"

Kennedy fine-tunes mechanics in bullpen session

STL@ARI: Kennedy strikes out eight over seven innings

LOS ANGELES -- In an attempt to be more consistent, right-hander Ian Kennedy worked on fine-tuning his mechanics Tuesday during his between-start bullpen session.

"Pretty much mechanical stuff," Kennedy said of what he thought was causing him to not be able to find the consistency he had in 2011 when he won 21 games. "Just getting back to things we've done in the past. Slowly bad habits start to creep in and they get bigger if you don't adjust them."

Manager Kirk Gibson said Monday that Kennedy had "gotten away from who he is."

Kennedy is hopeful that Tuesday's throwing session will start the process of getting him back.

"There's no quick fix to anything," Kennedy said. "It's just about getting back to making sure all the little points are good throughout the bullpen and not getting lazy about it."

After starting 31 games, Prado gets rare day off

SF@ARI: Prado's homer gives the D-backs the advantage

LOS ANGELES -- Manager Kirk Gibson walked by Martin Prado on Monday and told him he would be getting Tuesday night off.

"Are you kidding?" Gibson said Prado replied.

No, Gibson was not kidding. After watching Prado start 31 of Arizona's first 32 games, Gibson felt like it was time for another break.

The decision comes the night after Prado had two hits and reached base three times. He has shown signs recently of snapping out of his slow start to the year.

"He's really pushed hard, he's been an awesome teammate," Gibson said. "Through the whole struggles every facet you'd ever want has been outstanding. Actually, I thought last night he swing the bat as well as good as he's swung it in a long time. You could see his old swing back."