HOU@TEX: Martinez fans Baker for first MLB strikeout

CHICAGO -- As expected, the Astros optioned right-hander David Martinez to Triple-A Oklahoma City on Tuesday to make room for Paul Clemens, who was added to the rotation and made his first Major League start on Tuesday.

Martinez appeared in two games with the Astros, allowing six hits and four runs (three earned) in 5 1/3 innings. He picked up his first career win Monday when he threw 2 2/3 innings and allowed five hits and three runs and blew a save.

"I was impressed with the fact he came into the game and didn't fare so well in the first inning and went back out and kept the game right there and gave the offense a chance to hit two big home runs and the bullpen chance to close it out late," manager Bo Porter said. "He did a tremendous job, and I think we'll be seeing him back here when the Triple-A playoffs are over."

Martinez was mostly a starter in the Minor Leagues this year, going 14-2 with a 2.02 ERA in 26 games (18 starts) at Double-A Corpus Christi before pitching in a couple of games at Triple-A prior to the Astros calling him up. At Corpus Christi, he often was the second "starter" in the Astros' tandem pitching philosophy.

"He's been productive throughout the Minor Leagues," Porter said. "You just look at the success he's had over the last two years, he's performed. He's went out and performed each and every year. He's a guy that gives us a lot of flexibility [in terms of starting or relieving]."

Mistakes not lost in the shuffle following win

HOU@CWS: De Aza scores after Hoes drops fly ball

CHICAGO -- The fact the Astros were able to slug five home runs to beat the White Sox on Monday night didn't mean that manager Bo Porter wasn't going to talk to his players about the handful of mistakes they made during the game.

"You look at the number of mistakes we made and we were very fortunate to win that game," Porter said.

The Astros dropped a fly ball in the outfield that led to a run, threw to the wrong base that helped a runner score, had a runner picked off first base and allowed a run to score on a balk. Porter talked to his infielders and outfielders Tuesday about tightening the defense.

"Sometimes it's good you're able to overcome situations and that's probably a good time to address it because it's not actually after a defeat," Porter said. "You're able to point out the necessary things you cannot continue to do and think you're going to play winning baseball."

Porter said he was "completely surprised" when center fielder Brandon Barnes threw to the wrong base in the sixth inning. He threw to third on a Josh Phegley single to try to get Avisail Garcia, allowing Phegley to take second. Phegley then went to third on a balk and scored on a single.

Instead of having runners at first and third with one out, which would allow the infield to play at double-play depth, the White Sox had runners at second and third with one out and the infield was in.

"It's a very big play," Porter said. "With the infield in, the message was managing the game and making sure you're lined up properly. If you look at the ball that Brandon Barnes threw, if there's a cutoff man there, the ball doesn't go all the way to [Matt] Dominguez [at third]. It's a team concept and everybody has some place they have to be. When you're not in the right place, bad things happen."

Zeid, Cosart reunite with former manager

HOU@TEX: Cosart strikes out three in six innings

CHICAGO -- When relief pitcher Josh Zeid was traded to the Astros from the Phillies two years ago, it was Double-A manager Mark Parent who delivered the news. Zeid and teammate Jarred Cosart both got a chance to reunite this week with Parent, who's the bench coach for the White Sox.

Parent was managing at Double-A Reading when Zeid, Cosart, Jonathon Singleton and Domingo Santana were traded to the Astros in the Hunter Pence deal. Cosart had Parent as his manager in 2010 in Class A Lakewood.

"When I got traded to the Astros, he told me he was extremely proud of me that day," Zeid said. "He said it was a great opportunity to go the Major Leagues. That day, you don't believe it, but he was right. He was one of my favorite managers to have, and it's nice to have it come full circle."

Cosart, who will start Wednesday's series finale at U.S. Cellular Field, had a long talk Monday with Parent, who congratulated him for his early success.

"Obviously, being in low A felt like ages ago, and he said obviously things clicked and I got better since my time with him, and he's been following me and Zeid and Singleton and kept up with us," Cosart said. "It's good to kind of rekindle with people you've played with or had coach you in the past. You meet a lot of people in the game, and he's a good person to know."